Project Management Knowledge Base

Go Back   Project Management Knowledge Base > Project Management Knowledge Base > Scheduling

View Poll Results: Did you study CPM (PDM/ADM) before learning how to use scheduling software?
Yes, I had formal training 28 33.73%
Yes, I studied a few books on my own 10 12.05%
No 34 40.96%
What does CPM, ADM & PDM stand for? 11 13.25%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-01-2005, 02:18 PM
pmkb's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cyberspace
Posts: 326
What's your foundation?

This should serve as an interesting informal poll. All votes are completely anonymous. No one (including pmkb.com staff) can see your vote.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-26-2005, 11:26 PM
Bernard's Avatar
Forum Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Friendswood, TX
Posts: 29
I find it interesting that so far everyone has had some form of training/education before learning to use a scheduling program. In my experience within the refining/petrochem space (at least with plant maintenance departments), I think the majority of turnaround schedulers do not have CPM training/education.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-14-2005, 03:59 PM
Forum Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: southern california
Posts: 12
I constantly keep an eye out for Intuitive interfaces and tools that put off any requirement for prior training before getting ROI.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-14-2005, 04:25 PM
pmkb's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cyberspace
Posts: 326
Matt, there are some who argue that easily accessible software has diminished the quality of scheduling as a discipline. PMI is currently working towards publishing a Practice Standard for Scheduling. Is critical path scheduling in danger of becoming a "lost art"?
__________________
"I love it when a plan comes together." - Colonel John "Hannibal" Smith, A-Team
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-18-2005, 11:17 AM
Forum Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: southern california
Posts: 12
lost arts all over the place

pmkb said "Is critical path scheduling in danger of becoming a "lost art"?"

HA, you bet, and it is just one of many "arts" that are being lost.... You can put a child behind the wheel of a car... and they could maneuver and navigate from point A>B, that doesn't mean they should be out driving around with the rest of us.

I'm far from any pro here; lost/not lost arts... BUT...

When I look for an intuitive product to interface myself (the customer) with the tool, I don't mean that I've any business operating the tool.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-20-2005, 02:58 PM
Bernard's Avatar
Forum Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Friendswood, TX
Posts: 29
Looks like the poll results are evening out a bit. This is more in line with my experience.

pmkb, I have seen some clients present "schedules" devoid of any task to task dependencies (hard logic). There were only date constraints. CPM scheduling may not be a lost art yet - there are plenty of professionals still around - but you have to wonder sometimes about the economic drivers in place for companies to situate folks in scheduling positions for multi-million dollar projects when it's obvious they don't know what they are doing.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-25-2005, 11:54 AM
harrywaldron's Avatar
Forum Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 25
I had formal training in advance, as I had American Management Association's Project Management training in the 1980s. I even studied about CPM and Network diagrams during College courses in the mid-1970s, before starting to work with MS Project about 10 years ago
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-17-2005, 09:39 AM
pmkb's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cyberspace
Posts: 326
Oh goodness, I see someone voted the "what does ADM, PDM & CPM stand for?" answer. These are acronyms for some basic scheduling concepts/methods:

ADM = Arrow Diagramming Method
PDM = Precedence Diagramming Method
CPM = Critical Path Method

ADM & PDM may be considered as (children/derivatives?) forms for implementing CPM.
__________________
"I love it when a plan comes together." - Colonel John "Hannibal" Smith, A-Team
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-10-2006, 12:38 AM
Forum Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Stevenson, WA
Posts: 5
I started using a product called Timeline 1.0 around 1988 or '89 when I started planning turnaround work for Shell Oil in Wilmington, CA. I had no training at all and had to figure out what was meant by tasks being ASAP or ALAP. I figured out relationships and resource loading as I went.

When I did finally get some schooling I understood all of the concepts and could make a schedule but I did not understand any of the standard scheduling terminology or theory. I was stumped on the first test that asked me to define CPM, forward pass, backward pass, TF, RD, etc... My first attempt at hand calculating a logic diagram was a disaster. Amazing what some real education can do for a person.
__________________
Tony Bolstad
Planner
Scheduling and Information Services, Inc.
www.1sis.com
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-21-2006, 04:42 PM
Forum Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1
Scheduling Education

I started out in the Air Force with a DOS based system called CSNAS. It stood for Computer Supported Network Analysis System. I used that in 1985 and 1986. Part of the training provided include basic scheduling theory and definitions (two days).

Jim Ivie
EVMS Consultant
jivie@dc.rr.com
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:29 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin - Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2009, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright (c) 2005 Measuring Up. All rights reserved.